Bone Creek Museum of Agrarian Art has opened a new exhibit, “Art and Poetry of the Barada Hills.”

The exhibit extends through October 22 in the museum’s North 40 Gallery.

Watercolor artist John Frederic Lokke of Wichita, Kan. and poet Jan Chism Wright of Richardson County have created a collection of artworks displaying a unique region of rolling hills in southeastern Nebraska.

The Barada Hills of Nebraska, pronounced “Bear’-a-dah, are primarily located in Richardson County and refer to the bluffs along the Missouri River.

The area has a unique and colorful history. The hills are named after Antoine Barada, the founder of the village of Barada. He was the son of a French count and an Omaha Indian Princess, and his exploits were mythic enough to be recorded by author Mari Sandoz.

The exhibit's 27 paintings, each with an accompanying poem, will share the specific details of this place and resonate with many others’ small town and rural experiences elsewhere in the Great Plains.

A native of Omaha, John Lokke is an artist, naturalist and amateur herpetologist. He received his bachelor’s degree in fine arts from the University of Nebraska in Omaha. He seeks out hidden places far from urbanization where he finds amphibians and reptiles. In Chism Wright’s poetry, he found a compliment to his own survey of the Barada Hills lack of human presence. For the past 15 years Lokke has been working and teaching art in the City Arts Gallery of Wichita, Kan.

Jan Wright moved in 1997 from Houston, Texas to a farm north of Barada. She said moving from the city was a change not just a change of place but a change of mind. Her educational path extended from the University of Houston to Rice, St. Thomas University and Peru State College.

If you go:

Bone Creek Museum of Agrarian Art is located at 575 ‘E’ Street, David City. Hours are Wed-Sat, 10am-4pm; Thurs, 10am-8pm; Sun 1pm-4pm. Appointments and tours available. Phone: (402)367-4488. www.bonecreek.org.

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