LINCOLN — A new warden has been appointed for the Diagnostic and Evaluation Center and Lincoln Correctional Center, beginning Dec. 29.

Taggart Boyd will come to Nebraska from Ohio, where he's been the deputy warden of operations at the privately-operated North Central Correctional Complex, a minimum-medium security men’s prison in Marion.

Nebraska Department of Correctional Services Director Scott Frakes said Boyd's experience in security and programming is an excellent fit for the prisons, and his perspective based on his Ohio experiences will benefit the entire agency.

Boyd began his corrections career in 1998 with the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction as a correctional officer at the Marion Correctional Institution. Since that time, he's held positions including case manager, unit manager, accreditation manager, inspector of institutional services and associate warden.

The new warden said he looks forward to working with the prisons' leadership to assess operations and provide a safe and secure environment.

Boyd holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in criminology from Ohio State University. He's a certified corrections executive through the American Correctional Association, a distinction for those at the highest executive level who oversee the development of policy and procedures in adult correctional agencies.

He replaces Executive Management Officer Jeff Wooten, who has filled the position since July, when Warden Fred Britten, 62, died suddenly following a brief battle with cancer. Britten had been with the department since 1977.

Boyd and his wife have two children. He plays hockey and coaches a youth hockey team.

Both prisons to which Boyd is assigned are on West Van Dorn Street.

The Diagnostic and Evaluation Center is a maximum custody, reception, diagnostic, evaluation, assessment, classification and assignment facility for men. It also houses interstate transfers, returned parolees and escapees and county safekeepers.

The Lincoln Correctional Center is a medium-maximum custody prison. Inmates are primarily younger, first-time prisoners. Besides general population housing, units also serve mentally ill and socially and developmentally impaired inmates, an inpatient program for sex offenders and those in protective custody.

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