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Platte County government agencies will no longer have to inventory items costing taxpayers less than $100, thanks to a change in the county’s inventory policy.

The Board of Supervisors voted unanimously Tuesday to approve revisions to the policy, which will exempt any item that costs the taxpayers of Platte County less than $100. Some government agencies had been taking the policy to the nth degree by listing anything and everything in their inventory, something the recent changes in the policy are designed to prevent.

“Anything less than $100 does not have to be inventoried anymore,” said Jerry Engdahl, District 6 Supervisor and County Board chairman. “That could be paper clips, pens, pencils (or) staplers. It was kind of unwieldy because there were so many items.”

“People are listing everything,” said Platte County Deputy Attorney Elizabeth Edwards Lay. “It’s overwhelming for officials to do that every year. What the county needs to be responsible for are the things that are costing the taxpayers more than $100.”

Discussion about the new revisions centered around how many agencies had been punished for having items still in their inventory that had been disposed of. Lay, for instance, talked about how an auditor had noticed that a $20 calculator was missing from the county attorney’s inventory. The calculator in question had been thrown out because it wasn’t needed.

Platte County Sheriff Ed Wemhoff was questioning the policy even before the recent change, asking for some additional revisions to make sure that county agencies had the blessing to dispose of small items.

“We have items such as a calculator, can we not put on our inventory requests to be disposed of?” Wemhoff said. “(When) the board signs those inventories, would that not be a blessing for those offices to throw away a calculator or some of this other stuff that keeps piling up?”

Engdahl, in particular, was concerned as to how the new rules would affect items listed as surplus.

“Are we going to address that somehow, instead of throwing things in the basement?” Engdahl said during the meeting. “If somebody throws a bench or a calculator down in the basement, we don’t know anything about it.”

Lay noted the board technically had the power to declare anything surplus; once that is done, it can do just about anything to dispose of it.

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“I don’t care how you get rid of it once it is declared surplus,” Lay said. “You can do whatever you want to it. You can take it to the dump, it doesn’t matter. But you have to declare it as surplus.”

Other board happenings:

*A new liquor license was approved for T-Bone Truck Stop in Columbus. The truck stop has been closed since March’s flooding, and due to that, the liquor license was placed in the mail, but never made it to the board. Without a liquor license, the company had to start over from scratch. The license will now allow for other alcoholic spirits to be sold alongside beer when the bar reopens.

*A budget was approved for E-911 facilities and services. The same budget had been approved by the Columbus City Council earlier and needed to be approved by the board as well for final approval.

*The board has set a date of next Tuesday to meet about setting levy limits for fire districts, townships, libraries, the Platte County Agricultural Society and the disaster fund. The meeting will commence at 9 a.m.

Zach Roth is a reporter for The Columbus Telegram. Reach him via email at zachary.roth@lee.net.

Get News Alerts delivered directly to you.

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.

Zach Roth is a reporter for The Columbus Telegram. Reach him via email at zachary.roth@lee.net.

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